Anointing of the Sick

Please contact the parish office at any time and make arrangements with one of our Priets. In cases of ilness, please notify us if you or a family member would like to receive Holy Communion at home, hospital or nusring homme, to make arrangements.

The Rite of Anointing tells us there is no need to wait until a person is at the point of death to receive the Sacrament. A careful judgment about the serious nature of the illness is sufficient. The Sacrament may be repeated if the sick person recovers after the anointing but becomes ill once again, or if, during the same illness, the person's condition becomes more serious. A person should be anointed before surgery when a dangerous illness is the reason for the intervention (cf. Rite of Anointing, Introduction, nos. 8-10).

Moreover, "old people may be anointed if they are in weak condition even though no dangerous illness is present. Sick children may be anointed if they have sufficient use of reason to be comforted by this sacrament. . . . [The faithful] should be encouraged to ask for the anointing, and, as soon as the time for the anointing comes, to receive it with faith and devotion, not misusing the sacrament by putting it off" (Rite of Anointing, nos. 11, 12, 13).

Only bishops and priests may be ministers of the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick. A penitential rite followed by the Liturgy of the Word opens the celebration. Scripture awakens the faith of the sick and family members and friends to pray to Christ for the strength of his Holy Spirit. The priest lays his hands on the head of the sick person. He then proceeds to anoint, with the blessed Oil of the Sick, the forehead and hands of the sick person (in the Roman Rite). He accompanies these acts with the words, "Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit. May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up" (CCC, no. 1513).

For those who are about to depart from this life, the Church offers the person Penance, Anointing of the Sick, and the Eucharist as Viaticum (food for the journey) given at the end of life. These are "the sacraments that prepare for our heavenly homeland" (cf. CCC, no. 1525). These rites are highly valued by Catholics as powerful aids to a good death. Since Holy Communion is the effective sign of Christ's Paschal Mystery, it becomes for the recipient the opportunity to unite one's own suffering and dying to that of Christ with the hope of life eternal with him. The special words proper to Viaticum are added: "May the Lord Jesus protect you and lead you to everlasting life. Amen

Mass Times

Holy Family

316 South Logan Street, Lincoln
Saturday: 4:00pm
Sunday: 8:00am and 10:00am

St. Patrick's

213 South Bogardus Street, Elkhart
Saturday: 4:00pm
Sunday: 8:30am

St. Thomas Aquinas

321 South Lafayette Street, Mt. Pulaski
Sunday: 10:30am

St. Mary's

805 N.W. Pearl Street, Atlanta
Sunday: 9:00am

Click here to view full Mass Schedule

Catholic Community

Rectory Hours:

8:00 am - 4:00 pm       Monday - Thursday,             Closed on Friday

Phone: (217) 732-4019


Holy Family

Carroll Catholic School, a Ministry of Holy Family Parish

St. Patricks

St. Thomas Aquinas

St. Marys Church

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Holy Day of Obligation - Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary - December 8, 2017